Distinguished Alumni

 

 

 Samuel P. Cowley

 23, 1899 - November 27, 1934
Brother Cowley, a Significant Sig, was an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation who was killed in the line of duty in a gunfight with Lester Gillis (Baby Face Nelson) in 1934 near Barrington, IL. 
He was the son of Matthias F. Cowley, and Apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by one of his four wives, Luella Parkinson Cowley.  He was born in Franklin, Idaho on July 23, 1899.  His half-brother, Matthew Cowley (son of Matthias F. and Abbie Hyde Cowley), was also an Apostle of the Church.

 

 Medium

Kent  Ryan

 Orson Kent Ryan won the International Balfour Award in 1932 from the Sigma Chi International Fraternity. Brother Ryan was an alternate on the 1936 Mens Olympic Basketball team. He also was a professional American football player who played defensive back for three seasons for the Detroit Lions in the National Football League.

 

Missing

 Sherman Lloyd

     Lloyd was born in St. Anthony, Fremont County, Idaho, Lloyd's father was a counselor in the Stake Presidency at the time.[1] Lloyd attended St. Anthony and Rexburg public schools. Lloyd was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Lloyd received his B.S. from Utah State University in 1935 and then studied law at George Washington University from which he received his LL.B. in 1939. He worked for the USDA while going through law school.[2] He was admitted to the bar in 1939 and began practice of law in Salt Lake City, Utah. He served as general counsel for Utah Retail Grocers Association 1940-1962. He served as member of the State senate from 1954 to 1962, serving as majority leader in 1957, president in 1959, and minority leader in 1961. He served as member of Utah Legislative Council from 1957 to 1961, chairman from 1959 to 1961. He served as Utah representative on board of managers of Council of State Governments from 1959 to 1961. He served as chairman of the Council of State Governments Committee on State Taxation of Interstate Income from 1961 to 1962. He served as director of Beehive State Bank from 1960 to 1966. He served as delegate, State conventions 1960, 1962, 1964, and 1966. He served as delegate, Republican National Convention, 1960. He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1960 to the Eighty-seventh Congress. Lloyd was elected as a Republican to the Eighty-eighth Congress, November 6, 1962 defeating fellow State Senator Bruce Jenkins.[3] Lloyd served in congress from (January 3, 1963-January 3, 1965). He was not a candidate for reelection in 1964 to the Eighty-ninth Congress, but was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination for the United States Senate. He returned to Utah to become vice president of Prudential Federal Savings, in charge of public relations. Lecturer at the University of Utah. Lloyd was elected to the Ninetieth and to the two succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1967-January 3, 1973). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1972 to the Ninety-third Congress. He was appointed assistant director of the United States Information Agency in 1973. He again returned to Utah to teach at Utah State University from 1973 to 1974, holding the Milton R. Merrill Chair in Political Science.[2] Lloyd was named a trade specialist in charge of the Utah office of the Department of Commerce in 1974. He was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination in 1976 to the United States Senate. He became an editor and publisher. Lloyd resided in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he died, December 15, 1979. He was interred in Salt Lake City Cemetery.

Missing 

Burns B Crookston

     Burns Crookston's was a gifted educator and advisor.  His definition of developmental advising: " ... Developmental counseling or advising is concerned not only with a specific personal or vocational decision but also with facilitating the student's rational processes, environmental and interpersonal interactions, behavior awareness, and problem-solving, decision-making, and evaluation skills" is a hallmark for current day psychology.

 

Medium 

F. LaDell Anderson

     LaDell Andersen began his college basketball career as a student at Utah State, where he earned Honorable Mention All American, All Conference guard, and Team Captain.  He also served as Vice President of Sigma Chi Fraternity, as a member of the Student Council, and as a member of the Blue Key National Honor Society.  Mr. Andersen competed in the Olympic Trials in New York City in 1952 before beginning his college coaching career at the University of Utah in 1956.  In 1961, he returned to USU, where he was Head Basketball Coach for 10 years, leading the Aggies to six post-season tournament appearances.  After two years of coaching professionally, he returned to become Athletic Director at USU. Some of his accomplishments include raising funds, enlarging the stadium, and establishing a women’s athletic department.  After 10 years as Athletic Director, he left to become Head Coach at BYU for three years.  For his achievements, he was inducted into the Utah Sports Hall of Fame and named one of the Top 100 Most Accomplished People in the State of Utah, 1888-1998.

Medium 

Jim Laub

     Jim D. Laub earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Communications from USU before eventually becoming President and CEO of Cache Valley Electric Company. Under his direction, the company has become the 39th largest electrical contractor in the nation.  In 1999, Mr. Laub was recognized by Ernst and Young as Utah Entrepreneur of the Year.  He has also served as Vice President of the Sunshine Terrace Board of Directors and Chairman of the Development Committee.   Over the years, his service to USU has been invaluable.   He served as President of the Big Blue Club’s Board of Directors and has been a member of the Gamma Kappa Chapter of the Sigma Chi Fraternity.  In 1985, he was a member of the Executive Committee of Cache County Republicans, as well as co-chair of the Northern Utah Governor’s Club from 1986 to 1987.   Jim has also been recognized by Sigma Chi Fraternity as a "Significant Sig."

 

Medium 

Ronald S. Hanson

     Ronald S. Hanson was born in Logan, Utah, attended Logan City Schools and was a graduate of Utah State University in 1955. At USU he was a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity (Gamma Kappa) where he served two terms as Consul, and was the winner of the 1955 Utah Province Balfour Award. In 1955 he was selected to lead the ritual exemplification at the 100th Anniversary of Sigma Chi in Cincinnati, Ohio.     In 1976 he was awarded the Utah State University Alumni Merit Citation, in 1982 the Distinguished Executive Award from the USU College of Business, and in 1986 the Distinguished Service Award, USU's highest alumni recognition.  He and his wife Shirley are each members of the Old Main Society.     He is the retired Vice Chairman and President of Zions First National Bank, Salt Lake City,  He began his banking career at The First National Bank of Logan in 1948 while a senior at Logan High School.  He served as President of The First National Bank of Logan and Pioneer National Bank of Logan.  At the age of 38 he was elected President of the Utah Bankers Association.  In 2008 he was inducted into the Utah Bankers Association Hall of Fame.     He was elected a director of The Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in 1976, the only Utah banker elected to that board in the history of the Federal Reserve.  He later served six years as a director of the Salt Lake City Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Franciso.  He has held high office in the American Bankers Association.     For eleven years he was a director of Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation of Oakland, California, and served fourteen more years as an advisor to the company's Retirement Plans Committee.     He served as Chairman of the Logan Regional Hospital (IHC), as trustee of Holy Cross Hospital, SLC, and as Chairman of The Deseret Foundation (Intermountain Health Care) for eight years, and a member of that board for thirteen years.  He is a trustee of the Urban Central Region of Intermountain Health Care.         He was a member of the Rotary Club of Salt Lake, and the Alta Club.  He is a member of The Salt Lake Country Club.  He served as a bishop and member of the Stake Presidency in the Logan Utah Second Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and was a missionary to the British Mission.     He and his wife Shirley have four children and ten grand children.

Medium 

Stan Hatch

     Stanley Hatch is a founding member of Hatch & Parent and served as its Managing Partner from 1968 to 1991. He has more than 38 years experience in land use regulation, public agency and water law and has been "of counsel" to the firm since 2001. Mr. Hatch's public agency clients include a major coastal water authority and numerous other governmental and private water purveyors. He has significant experience in providing legal counsel and advice to senior management and governing boards of public agencies, having served as general and special counsel for a number of water authorities and special districts throughout his career and having served as special water counsel as well as City Attorney for a variety of government agencies and cities in California. While serving as President of the State Water Contractors Association, Mr. Hatch was a lead urban negotiator in a process that resulted in the " Monterey Amendments" to the State Water Contract, which, in turn, resulted in a potential reduction in future State Water Project costs to urban water users in California of over $1.5 billion. Mr. Hatch was one of the early leaders in implementing technological advancements in the legal profession in the 1980s and served on the national board of directors of LawNet, Inc., as its Executive Vice President. After graduation from Harvard Law School, Mr. Hatch served two years in the U.S. Air Force as a Judge Advocate. In 1961, he joined the Santa Barbara Office of County Counsel, and also served as the County's Legislative Advocate for four years. During this period he successfully litigated the landmark case which removed all billboards from the highways in Santa Barbara County.

 

Medium 

Dr. Harman Eyre

Harmon Eyre has served as the Chief Medical Officer since 1993. He has a career-long interest in cancer research and education promoting the goals of cancer prevention, early detection and quality treatment. As an American Cancer Society volunteer for over 22 years and National President in 1988, he has been instrumental in developing the Society's priorities, including efforts to decrease smoking, improve diet, detect cancer at the earliest stage, and provide the critical support cancer patients need. Since joining the Society's national staff, Dr. Eyre has guided efforts to enhance and focus the research program, upgrade the Society's advocacy capacity, and concentrate community cancer control efforts in areas where they will be most effective.  This work follows a successful academic career as a medical oncologist at the University of Utah, where he served as Associate Chairman of Internal Medicine and Deputy Director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Dr Eyre has received degrees and postgraduate training from Utah State University, the University of Utah, Johns Hopkins University, and the National Cancer Institute. He has been recognized for his service to numerous professional societies, government groups, and voluntary health agencies in the United States and abroad, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association for Cancer Research, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Surgeons, the National Action Plan on Breast Cancer, the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study, the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, The Centers for Disease Control and the President's Cancer Panel.

 

 Dr. William Rolfe Kerr

 

William Rolfe Kerr (born 29 June 1935) is the president of the Logan Utah Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He served previously as the fifteenth Commissioner of Church Education and is an emeritus general authority of the LDS Church. Kerr was called to the Second Quorum of the Seventy on April 6, 1996 and then to the First Quorum of the Seventy on April 5, 1997. He was granted emeritus status and released from the First Quorum of the Seventy on October 6, 2007 but remained as Commissioner of the Church Educational System. He was released as CES commissioner on August 1, 2008.[1] Kerr made his career in the field of learning, in administrative positions at Utah State University (USU), Weber State College (now a university), the University of Utah, Dixie State College of Utah (where he was president), and Brigham Young University. He was commissioner of the Utah System of Higher Education when called as president of the Texas Dallas Mission in 1993. Kerr was born in Tremonton, Utah and grew up on a farm. He earned a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from USU, intending to spend his life farming—until he was offered a position as coordinator of student activities at USU after his military service. He later received a master’s degree in marriage and family relations and a doctorate in education. After serving in the British Mission, Kerr met Janeil Raybold at USU. They were married 15 September 1960 in the Logan Utah Temple. The Kerrs had six children. Kerr was a stake president and also served in bishoprics and on the Sunday School General Board. For two years in the 1960s, he was involved in helping organize the LDS Student Association.

 

Medium 

Dr. Richard Parkinson

 Significant Sig Dr. Richard Parkinson was an obstetrician in the Palm Springs, California, area for 40 years. He also treated patients in the nearby state prison for several years. He was a volunteer physician during the Vietnam War. And, at 87, he now runs a free clinic in Indio, California.

 

Medium 

Kent Colton

     

Kent Colton is currently a Senior Scholar in housing studies at the Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, where he recently completed a book, entitled Housing in the 21st Century: Achieving Common Ground (Harvard Press June, 2003). He is also President of K Colton, LLC, and is engaged in a range of consulting and entrepreneurial activities related to housing. He also served as a member of the Millennial Housing Commission established by the US Congress. The Commission completed its report May 30, 2002.  Kent Colton is the former Executive Vice President and CEO of the National Association of Home Builders, a position he left in May 1999 after serving as the CEO for 15 years. He has more than 30 years of experience as a housing scholar and expert in the field of mortgage finance and housing policy.  During his tenure as the Chief Executive Officer, NAHB grew from 120,000 to a membership of 199,000 and implemented a wide range of new programs. Colton was responsible for managing a staff of more than 340 and overseeing an annual budget of $55 million. He also implemented a long-range planning process to outline the major business and policy challenges facing the housing industry in the future.  Colton moved to NAHB in April of 1984 from Freddie Mac where he served as executive vice president of policy, planning and economic research.  In June 1981, Colton was appointed staff director of the President’s Commission on Housing. Ten months later, the Commission sent its 275-page report to then-President Ronald Reagan with more than 100 major policy recommendations on housing and the nation's housing finance system. Before joining the President’s Housing Commission, Colton was a professor of public management and finance at Brigham Young University’s Graduate School of Management. He also served as an Associate Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Department of Urban Studies and Planning and as an Associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies of MIT and Harvard University.  A 1967 graduate of Utah State University, Colton received an M.P.A. from Syracuse University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in Urban Studies from MIT in 1972. In 1974, he was chosen as a White House Fellow and served as a special assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury. Over the years, he has written numerous articles and books on housing finance, the secondary mortgage market, housing policy and a range of management issues.  Colton and his wife, Kathryn, have five children. They live in McLean, Virginia.

 

Medium 

Merlin Olsen

    

Merlin Olsen is a former football player in the National Football League and an actor. He played his entire 15-year career with the Los Angeles Rams and was elected to the Pro Bowl in 14 of those seasons, a current record shared with Bruce Matthews. He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame.  Born to Lynn Jay and Merle Barrus Olsen in Logan, Utah, Sep 15, 1940, Olsen is the second of nine children. He attended Utah State University, is a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, and was a three-year letterman in football as a defensive tackle. In football, as a senior, he was a consensus All-American selection (making the vast majority of All-America teams) and was the winner of the Outland Trophy. After Olsen's junior year of 1960 he was also named All-American by the Football Writers Association of America and Newspaper Enterprise Association. He was also All-Conference in both 1960 and 1961 and an Academic All-America in 1961. As a senior the Aggie defense Olsen anchored gave up an average of 50.8 rushing yards (which led the nation), 88.6 passing yards, and 139.4 total yards which all still stand as school records for defense. The 1961 Aggie defense gave up an average 7.8 points a game, which is second in team history behind Olsen's 1960 team, which allowed 6.5 points per game.[1] Additionally, the Aggie defense held four opponents to less than 100 total yards. One, the University of Idaho, was held to a school-record 23 total yards, with the Aggies winning 69-0. The Aggies, not known as a national power football program, finished 10th in both the AP and UPI post-season polls, the only time that has occurred in school history. The Aggies had a combined 18-3-1 record during Olsen's junior and senior seasons under coach John Ralston and were conference champions those two seasons as well. Olsen played in the East-West Shrine Game in 1961 and in 2003 was voted to the game's Hall of Fame[2]. He also played in the Hula Bowl after his senior season and was voted MVP of the game[3]. Olsen is a member of the State of Utah’s Sports Hall of Fame, the Utah State University Sports Hall of Fame and USU’s All-Century Football Team. In 2000, he was selected by Sports Illustrated as one of the State of Utah’s Top 50 Athletes of the Century. He was voted to the All-Academic All-America Hall of Fame in 1988. In 1969 he was voted to the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Time All-America team with collegiate greats such as Bronco Nagurski, Red Grange, Jim Thorpe, and O.J. Simpson, among others. [4] NFL Olsen played professionally (from 1962 to 1976) for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. A leading defensive star of his era, he did not miss a single game in his 15-season NFL career. He was All-Pro in 1964, and 1966 through 1970. He was voted second team All-Pro in 1965, 1973 and 1974. Coming out of college, Olsen had offers from both Los Angeles of the NFL and the Denver Broncos of the rival American Football League. He chose the security of the NFL and signed with the Rams. Olsen's first contract was for around $50,000 for 2 years, plus a bonus. It was 1962, and the average football player salary at the time was around $12,000 a year. He was the first USU Aggie to be drafted in the 1st round of the NFL draft. Olsen almost ended up on offense, but was later moved to the defensive line after a few experiments in practice. Soon he became part of one of the best front fours in NFL history. Deacon Jones, Rosey Grier, and Lamar Lundy joined Olsen on the defensive line in 1963 that was aptly nicknamed "The Fearsome Foursome." He was named the Associated Press NFL Defensive Player of the Week for week 12, 1965. Olsen scored his first touchdown in that game. Throughout the 1960s, this foursome terrorized opposing offenses. Olsen's play helped the Rams to the playoffs in 1967 and 1969. He was voted the club's Outstanding Defensive Lineman from 1967-70 by the Los Angeles Rams Alumni. In week 14, 1967, Olsen and the rest of the Fearsome Foursome were named the AP NFL Defensive Players of the Week for their performance against the Baltimore Colts. In the 1970s, Olsen continued his dominant play at defensive tackle and his 11 sacks in 1972 was second on the team. After week 8 in 1972 Olsen was named the Associated Press NFL Defensive Player of the Week for the third time in his career. The Rams won the NFC West crown in 1973 through 1976 thanks in part to the solid play of Olsen. They ranked first in the NFL in run defense in 1973 and 1974 and finished second in sacking opposing passers both years. In 1973 Olsen was voted the NFLPA NFC Defensive Lineman of the Year and the next season, 1974, he was voted the Bert Bell Award as the NFL MVP as voted by the Maxwell Club. Olsen accepted the award "on behalf of all who toil in the NFL trenches". In 1975 and 1976 the Rams defense finished second in the NFL against the run while ranking in the top 5 in sacking opposing quarterbacks and compiling a 22-5-1 record over those two seasons. Olsen's last game was the NFC Championship game in 1976 at Bloomington, Minnesota. The Vikings took advantage on a freak play early in the game. A blocked field goal returned 90 yards for a touchdown shocked the Rams in the first quarter. The defense was later victimized by a couple of big plays by the Vikings. The Rams came up short, losing 24-13, bringing the storied career of the Rams finest defensive tackle to an end. Olsen made the Pro Bowl a record 14 times throughout his career, only missing it on his final year. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1982. In 1999, he was ranked number 25 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players. After NFL retirement Following his retirement as a player, Olsen went to television as a color commentator, teaming with Dick Enberg on NBC's coverage of the AFC throughout the 1980s. He and Enberg also teamed for the Rose Bowl Game broadcast beginning with the 1980 Rose Bowl through the 1988 Rose Bowl. He also enjoyed success as an actor. When Little House on the Prairie actor Victor French left to star in his own comedy Carter Country in 1977, Olsen was tapped to play Michael Landon's new sidekick Jonathan Garvey. One memorable quote from Merlin during the series, "I don't know a thing about football" was when Charles and Jonathan were to coach a boys football team. A couple of years later, Landon cast Olsen as the masquerading priest Father Murphy. He has been a commercial spokesman for FTD Florists. His most recent television acting work was in the short-lived 1988 TV series Aaron's Way, in which he played the lead role. Olsen has often co-hosted the Children's Miracle Network telethons, a humanitarian organization founded in 1983 by Marie Osmond and John Schneider. He also appears in many Sigma Chi promotional campaigns; Olsen is a Life Loyal Sig, Significant Sig (given to members for distinguishing acts outside the fraternity) and a member of the Order of Constantine (given for service to the Fraternity). Olsen donated one of his cleats, which were bronzed, to be used during the annual football rivalry between two Las Vegas high schools, Eldorado High School and Chaparral High School, which both opened in 1973. Each year, Olsen presents the "trophy" in the ceremony at the rivalry game. He was named the Walter Camp Man of the Year in 1982. He was also named Athlete of the Century for the state of Utah. Personal life He is married to Susan Wakely (30 March 1962 - present) . They have 3 children, Kelly, Jill, and Nathan. One of his younger brothers is Phil Olsen. They played together with the Rams from 1971-1974. Brothers, Merlin, Phil and Orrin all played in the NFL. Another brother, Clark, has a son, Hans, who later played professional football, in the family tradition. Merlin is a passionate fisherman, and enjoys fly fishing the most. In total, he has three brothers and five sisters. Colleen, Clark, Lorraine, Gwen, Phil, Winona, Ramona, and Orrin. Merlin is the first son, and second child of nine children born to Merle Barrus and Lynn Jay Olsen. He has four grandchildren.

 

Medium 

Jim Turner

    

Born March 28, 1941 in Martinez, California Jim Turner  is a former NFL football player. A quarterback and placekicker, he played college football for Utah State University and was signed as a free agent in 1964 by the American Football League's New York Jets head coach Weeb Ewbank. "Tank" kicked a then record 145 points in the 1968 regular season, with a professional football record 34 field goals. Turner kicked for nine points in the AFL Championship game win over the Oakland Raiders, and ten points in the Jets's 16-7 defeat of the Baltimore Colts in the Third World Championship of Professional Football, Super Bowl III. The last of Turner's three field goals in Super Bowl III was for 9 yards, the shortest in Super Bowl history. At that time, the goal posts were located at the front of the end zones. They have since been moved to the back, so it's no longer possible to kick a field goal for this short a distance. In the locker room after the game, on national television (NBC-TV), Turner shouted "Welcome to the AFL !" Following the AFL-NFL merger, Turner also played with the Denver Broncos for another nine seasons and kicked four points in a losing effort in Super Bowl XII against the Dallas Cowboys. He was inducted into the Denver Broncos Ring of Fame in 1988. Turner finished his career with 304 of 488 (62%) field goals and 521 of 534 extra points, giving him 1,439 total points.

 

Medium 

 

Bob Lamkin

 

 Bob Lamkin (far left) has been in Las Vegas, Nevada as Director of Real Estate at UNLV since July, 1969.  He served Sigma Chi as a Grand Praetor of the Utah Nevada Province after Jack Clawson, (all honor to his name) who saw Bob in the Gamma Kappa chapter room after a USU football game and said "Hey Limpy, you're the new Grand Praetor for the Utah Nevada Province and I said "what is a Grand Praetor?"  He said, "that's not important right now, we need someone from the South and you are our man, give me a call and I'll get you started."  Bob has also served as the chapter advisor of the Zata Chi chapter at UNLV and has been a member of the Southern Nevada Sigma Chi Alumni Chapter for forty years.  In fact, he is a charter member.  He and two other "out of town" Sigs put it together one day while having lunch and the then Desert Inn casino.  He has also served as a member of the faculty of the Leadership Training Workshop for a number of years.  He was elected as a member of the Order of Constantine, an honorary award of Sigma Chi.

 

Medium 

 

Steven A. Jensen

     

Steve was born in Provo, Utah, but his family moved to Salt Lake City during his first year of life. He attended numerous schools in Salt Lake City and graduated from  Olympus High School in June, 1959. Steve’s parents were both from Cache Valley. He loved spending time on his grandparents’ farm in Hyrum, working during the summers and enjoying the rural life.  He always felt at home in Cache Valley and registered at Utah State, (his father’s alma meter). He had four uncles who were members of Sigma Chi, so it was logical when he pledged Gamma Kappa and moved into the house as a pledge. Steve joined the National Guard to fulfill his draft requirement. After his basic training  He returned to Utah State, but was soon called to active duty when President Kennedy called up the reserves for the Berlin Crisis. He attended officer candidate school and served for the remainder of the call-up as an officer. He retired as a Captain in 1970. He took a great deal of pride and patriotism for our nation, which was apparent throughout his life. Steve cared a great deal about Sigma Chi. When he cared about something; he put his heart and soul into it. He was passionate about the ideals and promise integral to the Fraternity, and committed a lifetime of service promoting the loyalty and brotherhood he had experienced.  Steve served Sigma Chi on multiple levels. They included: Consul, Gamma Kappa, 1964 Assistant Executive Secretary, 1965-67 Grand Praetor, Rocky Mountain Province, 1969-1977 Leadership Training Workshop Board, Consul’s Faculty Grand Council as a Grand Trustee Order of Constantine Recepient of 10 Grand Consul Citations Steve owned Baker Engraving Company and lived in Littleton, Colorado from 1967-1993. He is survived by his wife, Pam, 2 daughters, Emily and Johanna, and 3 grandchildren.

 

Medium 

 

Dr. William Roger Budge

    

 Dr. Budge was born in Utah. He graduated from the University of Utah, College of Medicine and received his cardiology training from the University of California, San Francisco at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. He is board certified in Cardiovascular Diseases and a Fellow, American College of Cardiology. He was Assistant Chief of Cardiology at the U. S. Public Health Service Hospital in San Francisco and was Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Budge has a private cardiology practice affiliated with Novato Community Hospital in Marin County, CA. He started practice in Novato in 1985. Dr. Budge has been a board member of the Marin Medical Society, volunteered for the Marin Chapter of the American Heart Association, and has served as a member of the Board of Directors of Novato Community Hospital. He is the Medical Director of the Critical Care Unit of Novato Community Hospital.

 

Medium 

John Williams

     

Originally from Grace, Idaho, John Williams, President of Gastronomy, Inc., in Salt Lake City, is a restaurateur by profession, but a preservation architect at heart. Many of the seeds for these joint interests were planted when he was a student at Utah State University.  Over the last twenty-five years, Mr. Williams has spearheaded the renovation and reuse of five historic Salt Lake City buildings. His dedication to these projects has not gone unnoticed. The National Trust for Historic Preservation honored him and his partners with its highest award, the National Trust Honor Award in 1998. Former Governor Bangerter praised Mr. Williams for his “significant contribution to the vitality and growth of the economy of the state of Utah, for providing outstanding leadership in the business community, and for premier achievements within the industry.”  Mr. Williams’ vision for historical preservation began in 1976 when he saw an exciting future for the condemned New York Hotel. He purchased the building and worked with architects, artisans and trades people to create a new life for the old hotel. Similar imaginative transformations followed, including turning the historical 1930 Firehouse No. 8 on 1300 East into the Market Street Boiler, and the old Salt Lake City High School into Club Baci, Baci Trattoria, and Café Pierpont.  Mr. Williams attended Utah State University, but his eagerness to follow his dreams interrupted his education. However, this has not diminished his love for the Aggies. He is a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. Williams also served as the inaugural chair of the Dean’s Advancement Council for the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Today, he continues to serve as a member of the Advancement Council.

 

Medium 

 

Phillip Vernor Olsen

    

 Born April 26, 1948, in Logan, Phil is a former center and defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams and Denver Broncos and the son of Lynn Jay and Merle Olsen. He also was a member of the Buffalo Bills. He is the younger brother of Pro Football Hall of Famer Merlin Olsen.  Olsen attended Logan High School, Logan, UT from 1963-1966. He was a three-year starter on the varsity football team as defensive tackle and offensive tackle. An all around athlete, he earned 8 varsity letters in football, basketball and track. While a Logan High Grizzly Olsen was voted All-Division, All-Region, All-State, All-American recognition in football as well as voted All-Division, All-Region in basketball (averaging 18 points a game as a senior). He was on the Top 100 recruits list in football in 1966. He received over 40 college football scholarship offers, making campus visits to Stanford, the University of Iowa, University of Utah, Brigham Young University, and Purdue University.  Phil Olsen was a three-year letterman and three-year starter and in 1969 was a consensus All-America selection for the Utah State University Aggies, in Logan, UT. Olsen was an Alpha Sigma Nu Honorary as one of top 12 USU Seniors, 1970, and like his brother Merlin is a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. Olsen was also the Aggie Team Captain, 1969 Team MVP, and the 1969 USU Athlete of the Year. Wayne Estes Memorial Award, 1970 for "Top USU Student/Athlete/Citizen". His jersey #90 was retired in 1970. After his senior season he played in the East West Shrine Game, the Hula Bowl, and College All-Star games. Many pro scouts stated that Olsen compared favorably with brother Merlin, "If he's got any negatives," says one scout, "we don't know about them."[1] In Olsen's junior year of 1968 the Aggies were 7-3 and had wins over the University of Wisconsin, Memphis State University, West Texas State, Utah and BYU. He was voted honorable mention All-America honors that season. In his sophomore year of 1967 the Aggies were 7-2-1 that year and were seven points from a 10-0 season. USU lost to Colorado State University 16-14 on a controversial officiating call that cost the team potential game-winning field goal attempt. The Aggies also lost to New Mexico State 10-9 on a failed two-point conversion that tipped off the receiver’s hands in the end zone which would have won the game. USU tied Wichita State 3-3 in the season opener in which the Aggie defense held Wichita State to 65 total yards and -2 yards rushing. (Former Dallas Cowboys and Miami Dolphins coach Jimmy Johnson was the WSU coaching staff at that time). Wichita State amassed only 65 yards in that game, the third-best effort in USU history. The Aggies held San Diego State University to -5 yards rushing and the University of the Pacific to -35 yards rushing, setting the then school record in that category in the process.[2] Olsen was co-Captain of the freshman football Team and played on the freshman basketball team as well. (Freshman were not allowed to play NCAA varsity sports until 1972). Dale Brown, of LSU fame, was Olsen's hoops coach as a freshman. That 1966-67 freshman basketball team still holds the record for most wins by a freshman team at USU. [3] Member of the State of Utah’s Sports Hall of Fame (inducted 1985) and USU’s All-Century Football Team [4]. Inducted into the Utah State University Sports Hall of Fame in 1994[5]. In 2000, was selected by Sports Illustrated as one of the State of Utah’s Top 50 Athletes of the Century. From 2002-2006 was a finalist for the College Football Hall of Fame[3]. He is also a Sigma Chi from the Gamma Kappa Chapter at Utah State University. NFL career Drafted in the first round (overall #4) of the 1970 draft by the Boston Patriots. Prior to reporting to the Patriots, he suffered a severe knee injury in practice the week of the College All-Star game in Chicago, IL when DT Mike McCoy of the University of Notre Dame, fell on his right knee, ending his 1970 season. Traded to the Rams before the 1971 season for a #1 draft choice and additional financial compensation. Suffered a second injury to the same knee after winning the starting position at right defensive tackle, yet was able to come back after five weeks and be the starter for the Rams in 1971 and 1972 next to his brother, Merlin Olsen. Merlin and Phil played side-by-side as defensive tackles for the LA Rams in 1971 and 1972, the only time in NFL history this has ever happened. A younger brother Orrin, played for the Kansas City Chiefs in 1976. Merlin, Phil and Orrin were all playing in the NFL in 1976, which is one of the few times in NFL history that three brothers have ever played at the same time. In 1973 and 1974 Phil was moved to defensive end where he backed up Fred Dryer and Jack Youngblood. Traded to the Broncos in 1975 where he reunited with Coach John Ralston who had recruited him out of high school to Stanford and had coached him the East-West Shrine Game. Olsen switched positions again, this time to center where he played through 1976. Olsen was the captain of the Broncos return teams both seasons there. In 1976 Rick Upchurch had a spectacular year as a rookie kick returner. That year, the Broncos tied the then-NFL record with 6 kicks returned for touchdowns, with Upchuch setting the NFL mark for punt returns for a touchdown in a season with four. That same season, in addition to starting more than half the games at center, Olsen blocked four kicks (a punt, two PATs and a field goal). The Broncos beat the New York Giants 14-13 after Olsen blocked a PAT and for his efforts he was presented a game ball. He moved on to the Buffalo Bills to reunite with his Ram coach Chuck Knox as one of the "Knox's Guys". These were players who Chuck Knox would bring into his teams to provide leadership, skill and experience. However Phil subsequently suffered a third knee injury and spent his time in Buffalo on the injured reserve unit. Other activities • With his brothers, Merlin and Orrin, ran the Olsen Brothers All-Sports Camps from 1971 through 1978 which was an introductory all sports camps for youngsters ages 8-17.  • He first obtained his real estate license in 1974, and during his NFL years and cultivated his interest in commercial industrial real estate through personal investments and partnership syndications. From 1984 to 1992, he was a licensed California real estate broker and a licensed securities dealer. Currently, he is a licensed real estate broker in the state of Montana with expertise in real estate brokerage and real estate development, as well as investor equity funding.  • He is currently the president of Know Your Strengths in Bozeman, MT. Olsen spends most of his time guiding clients and executive-level management through processes dealing with talent discovery, recruiting, job matching, training, motivating, managing and retention.  • Olsen is a Certified DynaMetrics Professional (CDMP) by Professional DynaMetric Programs [6]. CDMP is their highest attainable credential dealing with the recognition of human potential and its applications in human performance. He is also credentialed by the Society for Human Resource Management as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR).  • Olsen is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys hunting, fishing, hiking, and horseback riding.

 

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Michael H. Dunn

     

Order of Constantine Sig Mike Dunn, graduated in 1976.  He is currently serving as Executive Director of Sigma Chi Fraternity International Headquarters and has since March of 2008.  Mike has served the Fraternity over the years through his work in various volunteer positions.  Dunn served as Grand Quaestor from 1997-1999; he served as Big Sky Province Grand Praetor from 1990-1997; and has been part of the Leadership Training Board.  He has served Sigma Chi in the following capacities; as a Balfour Leadership Training Workshop faculty member; as Northern Arizona chapter advisor; and as a member of the Cornerstone Operating Board and various other committees. 

 

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Jonathan  W. Bullen

     

Jonathan W. Bullen was born and raised in Logan, Utah, where he graduated with a degree in business from Utah State University in 1978. He began his professional career as general manager of radio station KVNU in Logan. Mr. Bullen subsequently became president of Cache Valley Broadcasting (CVB), then later formed JWB Cable Company, which purchased the television assets from CVB. In 1989 he sold his cable television interests to Sonic Cable. In 1990, Mr. Bullen began investing in real estate and is now one of the largest stockholders of portfolio real estate assets managed by Wasatch Property Management, with holdings and properties in Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California. In addition, he is the owner and president of Provo College, Eagle Gate College, and Evolution Fitness. He is also the owner and manager of Bullen and Harris LLC, a management and investment company. Mr. Bullen’s community service includes serving as the executive director of the Capitol Arts Alliance from 1990-1992. The Alliance spearheaded the renovation of the Ellen Eccles Theatre and Bullen Center in downtown Logan. In addition to serving as a trustee and board member of the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation, he also serves as chairman of the Utah State University Foundation and the Oquirrh Institute, and is a member of the Utah Opera Chorus. Mr. Bullen has served as counselor in an LDS bishopric, stake high councilor, and Young Men’s president. He is married to the former Julie Harris of North Logan and they have four children. His hobbies include fishing, hunting, biking and singing. Mr. Bullen resides in Salt Lake City and San Diego and he is a loyal Aggie fan.